a collection of atoms unanimously in favor of the Oxford comma


Huffington Post: Does Medicine Actually Make People Live longer?

A man wearing a giant sponge costume drifted through a sea of tuxedos in London’s Natural History Museum. 
A man in a smoking tuxedo surveyed it all, feeling like a clown. Camilo Mora was the event’s featured guest, and the hundreds of scientists, reporters and guests were here to celebrate a discovery that hadn’t actually happened — a discovery Mora was supposed to have made. 


Huffington Post: The Strange Story Behind The Animals We Know We Haven’t Yet Discovered

A man wearing a giant sponge costume drifted through a sea of tuxedos in London’s Natural History Museum. 
A man in a smoking tuxedo surveyed it all, feeling like a clown. Camilo Mora was the event’s featured guest, and the hundreds of scientists, reporters and guests were here to celebrate a discovery that hadn’t actually happened — a discovery Mora was supposed to have made.


The Cut: My Life With a Sleep Disorder That Makes Me Nocturnal

Eventually, she let me go with instructions to try drinking some warm milk before bed. That night, I dutifully microwaved a mug, knowing as I did it that it wouldn’t work. None of the “sleep hygiene” tips ever did. But following them felt almost religious, like staring at illegible Hebrew at bar mitzvahs. As long as I did everything I was supposed to, I could feel less guilty about breaking society’s sacred schedule. Warm milk, meditation tapes, breathing exercises — these were my penances.


The Atlantic: The Myth of the Barter Economy

Imagine life before money. Say, you made bread but you needed meat. But what if the town butcher didn’t want your bread? You’d have to find someone who did, trading until you eventually got some meat. You can see how this gets incredibly complicated and inefficient, which is why humans invented money: to make it easier to exchange goods. Right? This historical world of barter sounds quite inconvenient. It also may be completely made up ...


The Atlantic: Would a Work-Free World Be So Bad?
People have speculated for centuries about a future without work, and today is no different, with academics, writers, and activists once again warning that technology is replacing human workers. Some imagine that the coming work-free world will be defined by inequality: A few wealthy people will own all the capital, and the masses will struggle in an impoverished wasteland ...


The Atlantic: The Weird Little Industry Behind a Mesmerizing Instrument
Josiah Collett, a 10-year-old autistic boy from Broxbourne, England, had always struggled with social interactions. But things were getting worse. In school, his peers told him that he shouldn’t be alive. He spent nights crying, unable to explain to his parents what had happened ...